Kanishka Raja

Against Integration

Greenberg Van Doren Gallery

September 9 – October 23, 2010

KR11, 2010Oil on canvas and panelTriptych: 48 x 60 inches (121.9 x 152.4 cm), 48 x 38 inches (121.9 x 96.5 cm), 48 x 60 inches (121.9 x 152.4 cm)Overall: 48 x 164 inches (121.9 x 416.6 cm)

KR10, 2010Oil on panelTriptych: 24 x 30 inches (61 x 76.2 cm), 24 x 18 inches (61 x 45.7 cm), 24 x 30 inches (61 x 76.2 cm)Overall: 24 x 81 inches (61 x 205.7 cm)

KR9, 2009-10Oil on canvasDiptych: 84 x 60 inches (213.4 x 152.4 cm), 84 x 39 inches (213.4 x 99.1 cm)Overall: 84 x 99 inches (213.4 x 251.5 cm)

KR 19, 2010Oil on canvas on panelTriptych: 40 x 26 inches (101.6 x 66 cm), 48 x 40 inches (x 121.9 x 101.6 cm), 40 x 26 inches (101.6 x 66 cm)Overall: 40 x 101 1/2 inches (101.6 x 257.8 cm)

KR 20, 2010Oil on panel16 panels: 24 x 30 inches (61 x 76.2 cm)Overall: 96 x 120 inches (243.8 x 304.8 cm)

KR21, 2010Latex acrylic paint on wallDimensions variable

KR12, 2010Ink and watercolor on paper10 1/8 x 21 7/8 inches (25.7 x 55.6 cm)

KR13, 2009-10Ink and watercolor on paper10 x 21 3/4 inches (25.4 x 55.2 cm)

KR14, 2009Inkjet, watercolor and colored pencil on paper11 3/4 x 16 5/8 inches (29.8 x 42.2 cm)

KR15, 2010inkjet, watercolor, colored pencil on paper22 x 30 inches (55.9 x 76.2 cm)

KR16, 2010Monotype13 7/8 x 22 inches (35.2 x 55.9 cm)

KR17, 2010Monotype16 x 22 inches (40.6 x 55.9 cm)

KR18, 2010Monotype16 x 22 inches (40.6 x 55.9 cm)

KR22, 2010Watercolor on paper10 x 22 inches (25.4 x 55.9 cm)

Solo exhibition

Greenberg Van Doren Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition of paintings by the New York-based artist Kanishka Raja. This will be Raja’s first solo exhibition with the gallery and will be on view from September 9th to October 23rd, 2010. The exhibition will feature new multi-panel paintings by the artist and a wall painting created on site in the front room of the gallery.

In Kanishka Raja’s depicted realms, private and public domains from disparate global settings interlock in a complex visual field comprised of multiple panels and variegated perspectival windows. Raja charges these lush and energetic domains with pulsating patterns drawn from his engagement with textile design and ornament. Inspired by Italian 15th Century “Ideal City” paintings that proposed model urban landscapes and demonstrated the principles of perspective, Raja’s new works are windows onto contemporary urban societies. He presents spatially and contextually incongruent views through settings ranging from banal office spaces, to communal points of meeting. Sports arenas or shopping malls encounter zones of global conflict and sites of manmade or natural disasters such as a flooded domestic interior or a stock market trading floor. Raja lends a painterly, hand-honed quality to the works, creating composite realms that capture notions of both the technological and the handmade.

While the communities that Raja proposes are both disjunctive and visionary, the original source material for his compositions is rooted in documentary images. Raja relies upon the newspaper as his primary means of accessing world news. He selects pictures from articles, cuts them out to disconnect them from the specific event or place they once referred to, and then places them into an archive. He then chooses images from this archive and reformulates them into a new visual language, proposing a contemporary arena characterized by fragmentation, simultaneity, and interconnectedness.

Kanishka Raja was born in Calcutta, India in 1970 and lives and works in New York, NY. Solo exhibitions include I Have Seen The Enemy And It Is Eye, Galerie Mirchandani + Steinrücke, Mumbai, 2009, In The Future No One Will Have A Past, Jack Tilton Gallery, NY, 2007, and Envoy Gallery, NY, 2007. Recent group exhibitions include Master of Reality, Rose Art Museum, Brandeis, University, 2009. Raja was the recipient of the 2004 ICA Artist Prize awarded by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, and has been awarded artist residencies at ISCP, New York and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Umbria, Italy. His work is included in the collections of the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, and The Meadows Art Museum, Dallas, TX.